History of sacroiliac (SI) joint disorders

Sacroiliac (SI) joint disorders and the associated symptoms have been well known for over a century. In fact, in the early 1900s symptoms which seemed to arise from the back were frequently attributed to the sacroiliac (SI) joint, and open surgical procedures were used to treat the joint. 

In 1934, a paper was published on the spinal disc as a source of pain in the back. As a result, disc treatment became the most common operation for orthopedic surgeons, and the sacroiliac (SI) joint was all but forgotten.1 Now, 70 years later, orthopedic and spine surgeons have recognized that the disc is not the only source of low back pain (LBP).

According to scientific data, it's common for pain from the SI joint to feel like disc or low back pain. To avoid unnecessary lumbar spine surgery, SI joint disorders should be strongly considered in low back pain diagnosis.2

"To avoid unnecessary lumbar spine surgery, SI joint disorders should be strongly considered in low back pain diagnosis."

 

  1. Mixter, WJ, and JS Barr. “Rupture of the Intervertebral Disc with Involvement of the Spinal Canal.” New England Journal of Medicine 211, no. 5 (1934): 210–215.
  2. Weksler, Velan, et al. The role of Sacroiliac (SI) Joint dysfunction in the genesis of low back pain: the obvious is not always right. Archives of ortho and trauma surgery. 2007 Dec; 10(127) 858-888. 

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